babyboomerang:

i think i might make one of those raccoon patches with felt later

This reminds me of some of Aleisa’s drawings!!
I love this movie and this drawing!

babyboomerang:

i think i might make one of those raccoon patches with felt later

This reminds me of some of Aleisa’s drawings!!

I love this movie and this drawing!

phasmids:

deleted scene of every episode

I don’t normally reblog things, but this made my day!!!

phasmids:

deleted scene of every episode

I don’t normally reblog things, but this made my day!!!

THE FUTURE OF JOANNA COOKIES

So if you follow me on twitter, you know my alter ego is @joanna_cookies, which isn’t really much of an alter ego to be honest.  You can follow me if you want to see excessive tweets complaining about the heat and awkward situations.

ANYWAY:

I have been thinking a lot about the future and growing up and other things that scare me and came up with a new list of potential outcomes of my life.

CHECK IT OUT:

The end got cut off because I can’t properly work a scanner, but I think I’d probably be fulfilled if I had access to baby goats all the time.

Postcards From a Femme Fatale

So excited about these gorgeous montage postcards. The humor and keen eye of Australian graphic artist, Kitty St. Clair, of Le Sphinx, is apparent in these cards the moment you lay eyes on them.

I am in love with her use of vintage ephemera and sensuality. Wouldn’t it be cool to do a bathroom or boudoir with some of her framed postcards?

Send your sophisticated friends one of these today!

Le Sphinx Etsy Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/LeSphinx?ref=top_trail

and find out more about this mysterious Kitty St. Clair’s work on her website

http://www.lesphinx.com.au/

I WISH I COULD HAVE TAKEN THIS CLASS
Offered in 2009 at Haverford College, it was called “Writing the UNWRITEABLE” and described here:
Lynda Barry has worked as a painter, cartoonist, writer, illustrator, playwright, editor, commentator and teacher and found they are very much alike. Writing the Unthinkable which is based on a tried-and-true method creative method that is playful, powerful, and accessible to anyone with an inquisitive wish to write or remember. Lynda explores the depths of the inner and outer realms of creation and imagination, where play can be serious, monsters have purpose, and not knowing is an answer unto itself:

Do you wish you could WRITE? Do you wish you had a better MEMORY? Do you want to make STORIES but are too confused about how to even start?
THIS IS AN INTENSIVE WRITING CLASS! It is not a social situation at all! In fact, you can be completely anonymous in this class! You don’t have to be cool! Your clothes can be square! You don’t have to read aloud or talk to anyone if you don’t want to! You don’t even have to make eye contact!
Can you dig that? If so, we can dig YOU! All you need is about 100 sheets of notebook paper, a three-ring binder (no other kind of paper set-up will work for this class) and a couple of your favorite pens.

Ahh. I love her.

I WISH I COULD HAVE TAKEN THIS CLASS

Offered in 2009 at Haverford College, it was called “Writing the UNWRITEABLE” and described here:

Lynda Barry has worked as a painter, cartoonist, writer, illustrator, playwright, editor, commentator and teacher and found they are very much alike. Writing the Unthinkable which is based on a tried-and-true method creative method that is playful, powerful, and accessible to anyone with an inquisitive wish to write or remember. Lynda explores the depths of the inner and outer realms of creation and imagination, where play can be serious, monsters have purpose, and not knowing is an answer unto itself:

Your Instructor

Do you wish you could WRITE? Do you wish you had a better MEMORY? Do you want to make STORIES but are too confused about how to even start?

THIS IS AN INTENSIVE WRITING CLASS! It is not a social situation at all! In fact, you can be completely anonymous in this class! You don’t have to be cool! Your clothes can be square! You don’t have to read aloud or talk to anyone if you don’t want to! You don’t even have to make eye contact!

Can you dig that? If so, we can dig YOU! All you need is about 100 sheets of notebook paper, a three-ring binder (no other kind of paper set-up will work for this class) and a couple of your favorite pens.

Ahh. I love her.

WHAT I’VE BEEN DOING

Oh Lord, I’ve been doing an awful job of updating, but it’s just that I’ve been doing so much craft research and planning for big projects ahead that I haven’t dared to expose any of my fragile ideas to you all yet. For the future expect comix (drawn with mine own hands, oh my my), a large window project, and glitter, lots of glitter - most likely.

Stay with us dear readers! Big things in the future….

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

The above photos come from two books both deserving of their own reviews (cue hyperventilating: I’m the worst blogger ever) which I certainly will get to work on, because they are both totally worth buying for any comic fan.

Scott McCloud, of course a huge authority in the comics-as-art world, wrote the above Reinventing Comics as a follow up to his literally, textbook-important, Discovering Comics.

Both focus on comics’ incredible ability to get stories deep down under your skin and he goes into incredible detail about how they do it. Scott employs so many different drawing styles and his intuitive layout makes it easy to follow along with some really high thought in the same way many of those “Islam/Freud/Post-Modernism —- For Beginners” books are so easy to read. If you’re a visual person already, or you like those books, you’ll enjoy McCloud’s style.

*********************************************

Speaking of creativity and intuition, the first and last photo above come from my absolute new favorite book and artist, What It Is, by Lynda Barry. Literally picking up this book is like exploring an Addams family haunted house boat ride into your own raw creative center. There is something glowing and pure and sweet and melancholic about Barry’s drawings, which use illustration of her own childhood, fortune cookies, vintage paper scraps, found objects, and most inspired, of course, glitter glue.

Every once and a while you find something that you know is raw perfection, art that expresses something huge and hurting which you don’t have the vocabulary quite yet for, and Lynda Barry’s drawings are what that is. More than anything, her work gives sensitive, abstract thinkers a vocabulary for their own hearts. Expect more posts on this book in the future!

Hello my friends!
I am back, and the love project is back on!
It’s a little different now, it’s mainly just 100 small instances about love in any form- whether it be from my cat, for romance, from a friend, or love for the sake of love!
Here’s the first in the series.  It’s from April 29, 2012.
I like drawing them in my red journal because I’ve been keeping a visual journal stuffed with little drawings for about two years now, and it just feels right that as I question the scariest and potentially greatest thing in the universe (no, not weeping angels), I continue to draw in my little lined notebook. 
More to come soon when I can figure out a proper pacing for making posts!  
I’ve also been recording some silly indie pop songs that I may post here when I finish them as part of the project! 

Hello my friends!

I am back, and the love project is back on!

It’s a little different now, it’s mainly just 100 small instances about love in any form- whether it be from my cat, for romance, from a friend, or love for the sake of love!

Here’s the first in the series.  It’s from April 29, 2012.

I like drawing them in my red journal because I’ve been keeping a visual journal stuffed with little drawings for about two years now, and it just feels right that as I question the scariest and potentially greatest thing in the universe (no, not weeping angels), I continue to draw in my little lined notebook. 

More to come soon when I can figure out a proper pacing for making posts!  

I’ve also been recording some silly indie pop songs that I may post here when I finish them as part of the project! 

GUYS JOANNA HAS AN ETSY SHOPPE NOW!

Honeyfox Prints

CLICKY HERE: http://www.etsy.com/shop/HoneyfoxPrints?ref=top_trail

Just thought I’d do a little posting and promotion for Glitter and Comix’s own darling- Joanna has setup a great little etsy shop offering handmade lino and woodcuts. Jo is a pro with printing, and her style and creativity with the prints is obvious- as you can see with her Creature From the Black Lagoon lurking in the cherry blossoms, above.

I just bought one of her delicate hands print, which are inspired by Japanese woodblock prints and the elegant purity of line and expressive gestures. Both of us are inspired by hands, it seems!

By the way, the paper Jo prints on is super-luxe; here’s a photo of another great poster she did hanging on my door.

The text in french is from the 60s New Wave film movement. It translates basically, as, “I want to say beautiful things, but I don’t know how.”

Gorgeous!

What I’m Having

Yesterday I was accidentally creative, and accidentally drunk, you might be thinking, when I mixed up this drink. It’s fairly sweet, and uses rosewater and pomegranate juice, two ingredients commonly used in middle eastern cooking, and culturally, in their mythology and folktales; that’s why I’m calling it The Persian Prince!

It would be pointless to go over the long history of the rose/red-rose as a symbol, but flowers, and roses in particular, have always been important to middle-eastern cultures, in particular in Iran, where I’ve heard guys will even wear flowers in their hair.

The pomegranate, too, is of course an important symbol in the Persephone/ Ishtar myths (the Babylonian counterpart to Persephone in the maiden/underworld story) 

I recently finished reading Penguin’s translation of Arabian Nights, which by the way, is a collection of lots of short stories told over 1001 Nights. I love way the passages that describe the meeting of the young prince and princess are written, and it’s great to see descriptions of male beauty, too, as always:

"Then the prince continued exploring the harem until he came to a second door with a curtain drawn before it. So, he lifted the curtain, and upon entering the room, he saw a couch of the whitest of ivory lined with pearls, jacinths, and jewels and four slave girls sleeping around it.

He went up to the couch to see what was on it, and found a young lady lying asleep. She looked like the full moon rising over the eastern horizon with her brow decorated by white flowers, her hair shining, her cheekscrimson and dotted by dainty moles. Indeed, he was amazed by her stunning beauty as she lay there, and he no longer was afraid of dying.

….When she saw how handsome and elegant he was (for clearly he was more radiant than the moon) she was ignited by the flaming fire of love, and they began to converse and talk.”

The ingredients for the Persian Prince are as follows:

  • pomegranate juice
  • Jagermeister
  • moonshine (if you don’t live in the south, I guess you can try whiskey instead)
  • 1 tbsp of rosewater


Add everything to taste. The moonshine I used is apple-pie flavored (and it’s weird, it really just tastes like apple pie!) so it can get quite sweet pretty fast, play around with what you like; pomegranate is a great flavor.

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